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Five Phi Theta Kappa Advisors Named 2015 Advisors Emeriti

Jackson, Mississippi - Five advisors have been named Advisors Emeriti by the Phi Theta Kappa Foundation and were recognized during the Advisors Luncheon at NerdNation 2015, Phi Theta Kappa's annual convention, in San Antonio, Texas, April 16-18.

2015 Advisors Emeriti are pictured with previous recipients.

Established by the Phi Theta Kappa Foundation, the Advisor Emeritus program is a select group of retired or retiring advisors who, after providing extraordinary leadership and achieving success, are invited to continue their engagement and support of the Society based on their interests and expertise in Phi Theta Kappa's programs. They must be nominated by a Phi Theta Kappa headquarters staff member. Then, an Advisor Emeritus Nominating Committee�makes an annual recommendation to the Phi Theta Kappa Foundation Executive Committee for approval, and an announcement is made at the Association of Chapter Advisors Luncheon at convention each year.

To be selected, the advisor must meet a majority of the following criteria:

  • Retired/retiring from serving as an advisor
  • Length of service of five years or greater
  • High level of contributions or engagement (Board Member, Regional Coordinator, Association of Chapters Advisors officer, Faculty Scholar, Honors Program Council, Advisor Continued Excellence Award, international distinguished chapter awards)
  • Extensive knowledge and expertise of Phi Theta Kappa and its programs
  • Desire to continue the Phi Theta Kappa Experience
  • Commitment to improving opportunities for community college students
  • History of providing financial support of programs

The 2015 Phi Theta Kappa Advisors Emeriti are:

Deb Dumond, York County Community College, Maine

James Mauldin, Redlands Community College, Oklahoma

Anita Neeley, Kilgore College, Texas

Barbra Nightingale, Broward Community College, Florida

Dave Strong, Dyersburg State Community College, Tennessee

Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society, headquartered in Jackson, Mississippi, is the largest honor society in higher education with 1,285 chapters on college campuses in all 50 of the United States, plus Canada, Germany, the Republic of Palau, Peru, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, the British Virgin Islands, the United Arab Emirates and U.S. territorial possessions. More than 3 million students have been inducted since its founding in 1918, with approximately 134,000 students inducted annually.



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