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Marshall Awards To Provide Recognition, Scholarships for Advisors

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Jackson, MS – Phi Theta Kappa is pleased to announce an exciting new professional development opportunity for chapter advisors. The Jo Marshall Leadership Award Endowment (Marshall Award) has been created to encourage the professional growth of Phi Theta Kappa advisors by providing a $5,000 stipend for the completion of a project that leads to personal leadership growth beyond the completion of professional degrees.

Dr. Jo Marshall

Dr. Jo Marshall

Advisors who have served for three years as of April 6, 2013, are eligible to submit a Marshall Award proposal. Selection will be based on the applicant's project proposal and potential for personal leadership growth through completion of the project as evidenced by the application. For the purpose of the Marshall application, personal leadership growth is defined as advancement, improvement, increase in knowledge, or general progress toward maturity in one’s leadership potential, pursued out of an individual desire for betterment or personal interest in the undertaking.

The award has been named in honor of Dr. Jo Marshall, a former chapter advisor who is currently serving as President of Somerset Community College in Kentucky.  She has been honored as a Faculty Scholar, Distinguished Regional Coordinator and Giles Distinguished Advisor. Dr. Marshall was one of the first recipients of the Mosal Award and is an International Honorary Member of Phi Theta Kappa.

Dr. Marshall has served as a leader in Phi Theta Kappa in many capacities – as advisor for the Pi Pi Chapter at Jefferson State Community College for more than 30 years, as Alabama Regional Coordinator, as the Regional Coordinator Representative and Vice Chair of the Phi Theta Kappa Board of Directors, and as Vice Chair of the Phi Theta Kappa Foundation Board of Trustees.

She has worked to provide exemplary professional development opportunities for chapter advisors as a Leadership Development Certification Program Facilitator. Dr. Marshall was also part of the team that took Phi Theta Kappa’s Leadership Development Program to Singapore. In addition, she is the founder and facilitator of the annual Faculty Scholar Conference, which prepares a select group of advisors to lead seminar groups at the Society’s Honors Institute.

“It is only appropriate that Phi Theta Kappa's most prestigious leadership development award carry the name of Jo Marshall. Dr. Marshall has served in nearly every leadership post in Phi Theta Kappa -- embracing each as a means by which to make Phi Theta Kappa stronger for all stakeholders,” said Phi Theta Kappa Executive Director Dr. Rod Risley. “She has demonstrated through her career that leadership can be taught, and that opportunity should be given whenever possible for others to realize their leadership potential.  The Marshall Awards serve to raise aspirations of our chapter advisors to step forward, lead and serve.”

The Marshall Award will join the Mosal Award, named in honor of longtime Phi Theta Kappa Executive Director Dr. Margaret Mosal, as the two most prestigious awards for chapter advisors. The first Marshall Awards will be presented at the 2013 Association of Chapter Advisors Luncheon at Phi Theta Kappa's Annual Convention in San Jose.  Applications are due February 22, 2013, by 5:00 pm CST. For more information and to download an application, visit http://www.ptk.org/benefits/awards/marshall.

Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society, headquartered in Jackson, Mississippi, is the largest honor society in higher education with 1,280 chapters on college campuses in all 50 of the United States, Canada, Germany, the Republic of Palau, Peru, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, the British Virgin Islands, the United Arab Emirates and U.S. territorial possessions. More than 2.5 million students have been inducted since its founding in 1918, with approximately 135,000 students inducted annually.